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Nottinghamshire Police ? 'Cunning predator' jailed


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'Cunning predator' jailed


Posted on 9th September 2011 16:30


A ?cunning predator? who sexually assaulted young boys over two decades has been sentenced to six years behind bars.

Peter Holland, 79, of Bankfield Drive, Bramcote Hills, Beeston, abused 13 boys ? now grown men ? between 1974 and 1993.

He pleaded guilty to ten counts of gross indecency and 15 counts of indecent assault and was sentenced to six years in prison at Nottingham Crown Court today (Friday 9 September).

Nottinghamshire Police arrested Holland in September 2010 after one of his victims came forward and reported the abuse he had endured as a child.

The man, now 38, said Holland had sexually assaulted him on a number of occasions when he was a young boy between 1979 and 1984.

Officers subsequently searched Holland?s address and discovered more than 1,300 photographs containing images of young boys or men.

Detectives launched an extensive investigation to trace the people in the pictures, and a further 12 men - now aged between 33 and 51 - were located.

All made similar allegations and said they had been sexually abused by Holland between the ages of 11 and 15.

The abuse took place at a number of different locations within Nottingham.

Holland pleaded guilty to all charges at Nottingham Crown Court on 10 August this year. On sentencing, the judge said he was taking into account the fact that Holland pleaded guilty.

Detective Constable Perveez Rashid, from CID, said: ?Holland is a manipulative and cunning predator who targeted young, vulnerable boys to satisfy his own perverse pleasure.

?His victims have shown incredible strength and courage in coming forward. They have suffered in silence for many years and have lived with the long and enduring pain of childhood abuse.

?The sentence handed to Holland today will hopefully offer them some comfort to know their attacker has finally been brought to justice. He has been convicted, will spend time in jail and his name will be on the Sex Offenders? Register for life.

?Nottinghamshire Police will do everything in its power to apprehend those who perpetrate these sorts of crimes, regardless of how long ago an offence was committed.

?All victims will be treated with respect and sensitivity and we will do all we can to secure a conviction to prevent people like Holland from harming anyone else.?

Anyone who would like to report a crime should contact Nottinghamshire Police on 0300 300 99 99 or call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.


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Such a bizarre thing to call such a fiend! Surely a "Cunning predator" is the title you would give to a super smart Velociraptor or an acclaimed Deer Hunter. Not some Peado that abuses kids!

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