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Crazy PC Modding.

Mod of the Year 2011

Published on 23rd December 2011 by Antony Leather










Mod of the Year 2011

2011 has undoubtedly been one of the best ever years for PC modding. In fact, so many projects have graced our world-famous modding forum that we've had real trouble sifting through all the incredible talent that's been on show this year. As it stands, this is our biggest-ever Mod of the Year competition, with 25 projects taking part.

However, the back-to-back winner, Attila Lukacs, who claimed 1st place in 2009 and 2010 is absent, as he's still working on his follow up project. As such, this year's much sought-after Mod of the Year crown is definitely up for grabs, along with some epic prize bundles.

That's not to say Attila wouldn't have had some extremely stiff competition. This year we've had some of the most amazing projects we've ever seen, from water-cooled desk PCs, TRON Lightcycles, wooden wonders, mini-ITX masterpieces, scale starships and of course more racy-looking water-cooled PCs than you can shake a stick at.

There's something for everybody, whether you're into mods or scratchbuilds, air-cooling or water-cooling. As usual, though, we need you to vote for your favourite projects - you've got multiple votes to use and if you vote you'll also be in with a chance of winning some awesome Carbon Fibre modding mesh from Mnpctech - we've got 25 prizes to give away, so check out all the amazing projects and vote for your favourites.

The projects are listed below in alphabetical order with a description and gallery on the following pages. Once you've finished trying to cope with all the eyecandy, head over to the voting page. You have ten votes - use them wisely!

Beta by Peter Husar (Gtek)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011


Charge! by Frenk Janse (Frenkie)
*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

Dreadnought by Javier Fernandez (pinchillo)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

Filtration by Nick Jones (skorchio)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

FLush by Kenneth Machielsen (K.3nny)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

L3p D3sk - Silent Workstation (l3p)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

Mid Century Madness by Jeffrey Stephenson (slipperyskip)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

Nike advanced by Paul Tan (paultan)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

PC-Beto by Hans Peder Sahl (p0Pe)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

Perspiration by Peter Ritchie (pistol_pete)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

Phinix Nano Tower by Mike Krysztofiak (phinix)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

ROG Rampage by Nguyen Dinh Ban (nhenhophach)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

Saturday Night Special by Jeff Alderman (bulldogjeff)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

Silverstone TJ11 Carbon by Richard Keirsgieter (keir)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

SR-2 Stacker by Paul Edwards (coolmeister)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

Stealthlow by Wayne Wilkinson (waynio)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

Steam & Current by Tomasz Krawczyk (awadon)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

Synthetica by Alex Ftoulis (AnGEL)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

The Retro HTPC by Magnus Persson ([WP@]WOLVERINE)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

Toxicity by Craig Stewart (craigr1982)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

TRON Lightcycle by Brian Carter (boddaker)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

USS Eurisko by Sander van der Velden (asphiax)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

WCC: A present from GlaDOS by Martin and Stefan Blass (thechoozen)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

White by Alain Simpels (alain-s)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011

Wii Unlimited Edition by Martin Nielsen (Angel OD)

*Mod of the Year 2011 Mod of the Year 2011






I particularly like the Dreadnought Pc.

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